Debating is the natural consequence of people having different political views in our society. The debates I am referring to take place around a single topic — gun control, illegal immigration, the Electoral College, you name it — and are contests of facts, not which “values” you possess. They take place in both formal setting (like competitive or parliamentary debate), and casual setting (like arguments with your friends or family). I have taken part in both types, and have found it to be a very important — yet fundamentally flawed—activity. Let me explain.

At the end of the day, debate…


Increased polarization, where the public is splitting into all far-left Democrats and far-right Republicans (which I will refer to as “radical” or “extreme” for lack of a more neutral word), is probably the most consistent and important trend in politics in recent history. I have argued that it is one of the three factors necessary to almost completely explain modern politics.

There are surely complex political science explanations for why this is happening, ones that I am certainly not qualified to describe. Instead, I want to focus on logical interactions, certain political phenomena that are difficult to avoid or see…


This post is partially reliant on my original post on the three factors that explain most of US Politics, especially where I talk about misrepresentation. Click here to read it.

Democrats care a lot about their Presidential candidate’s electability. And for good reason, too. Democrats don’t just need someone to beat Trump, which I don’t think will be that hard given his consistently low approval ratings, but they need someone to win enough votes to take back the Senate. Senate performance is increasingly tied to the presidential race, with 2016 seeing a Democrat elected to the Senate in every state…


This post will be based on my last post, which explained what I see to be the three factors that define almost all of U.S. politics. Click here to read it if you haven’t already.

The 2020 Democratic Primary is in full swing, with the first two debates now behind us. And already, some of the main storylines have begun to take shape. The central character thus far is Joe Biden, who is polling ahead of everyone else but who has endured constant attacks during the first two debates. …


Political analysts have a hard job. Politics can seem quite unpredictable. We never quite know how Trump is going to react in any situation. Equally unpredictable is which Republicans in Congress will abandon Trump on any policy. And who is going to win the next election? No one can say for sure, and given how unique our modern political atmosphere is, it can be really tough to tell.

But if you ignore a lot of the intricacies, politics today is very predictable. In fact, I would argue that it is the most predictable it has ever been. 90% of politics…


The U.S. House of Representatives is one of the worst political chambers in the world. Perhaps the biggest problem with the chamber is gerrymandering, where politicians draw districts that benefit their own political party. In the House, that means whichever political party is in charge of a state government when the state redraws its congressional districts — every 10 years, after the census — gets to gerrymander the map to their heart’s content. Some states, often by referendum, have adopted independent redistricting commissions to draw their districts so that politicians will not intentionally gerrymander them. …

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